How to convert backup archive (.tib, Acronis) to VHD or VM


Following virtual machine formats are available:

  • Microsoft Virtual PC
  • VMware Workstation
  • Citrix XenServer OVA
  • Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization
  • Kernel-based virtual machine

1. Download the trial version of Acronis Backup 

2. Install Acronis Backup (next-next mode)

3. Run Management console and choose Recovery

4. Do steps described in this KB: https://kb.acronis.com/ru/content/35282

5. Tested and verified 🙂

4 thoughts on “How to convert backup archive (.tib, Acronis) to VHD or VM”

  1. Last version (12.5) looks nowhere like previous one (11.5), for which the description applies.

    Now it is managed via web browser.

    It probably has ability to export backup file as virtual machine, though it is not installed by default (and Hyper-V support is disabled on anything but servers with Hyper-V role).

    I would have tried it (I have one backup copy of Acer Easystore H340 internal flash provided by some kind soul – my flash seems to be overwritten), but for me current Acronis Backup bombed out with some http error while trying to mount the backup (I intended to make image file out of it by for example Winimage, if I wouldn’t find relevant option for conversion to VMWare).

    I will be trying 11.5 version, as soon as it would install.

    It could be found on some sites, I’ve found it here:
    https://www.instalki.pl/programy/download/Windows/archiwizacja_danych/Acronis_Backup_Recovery_10_Workstation.html
    (click on big orange “POBIERZ TERAZ”).

    One might be reluctant to download and run things from some dodgy sites in foreign language (while instalki.pl is not one of the most reputable sites, it is not bad either – but I certainly understand that for someone that does not speak Polish it might be dodgy/rogue/etc), but they’re linking to official Acronis download server – so in fact, you’re downloading from dl.acronis.com.

    Hmm… maybe I just paste a direct link:
    http://dl.acronis.com/u/trial/ABR11.5S_trial_en-US.exe

  2. For the record – mentioned KB article seems to be no longer online. Fortunately, Web Archive comes to the rescue:
    https://web.archive.org/web/20140406185652/http://kb.acronis.com:80/content/35282

    Regarding my previous comment:

    Hmm… it seems that UI didn’t changed much between Acronis Backup 11.5 and Acronis Backup 12.5, though now everything is done via web browser.

    In 11.5 there was still the same stupid file selector (why on earth they couldn’t have used Windows Open dialog and why they must have reinvented the wheel??). If you think its OK, then try to select file on VirtualBox shared folder… (it asks for the password when entering \\Vboxsrv UNC path… but there’s none…)

    Anyway, older version didn’t helped at all. By selecting Recovery. I couldn’t chose tib file at all!

    Mounting was no-go either, with some error message.

    In the current (Acronis Backup 12.5) version I could at least browse the archive (after double clicking it) and possibly copy files out of it, but didn’t this since I wanted binary copy of the whole volume.

    (In Acronis Backup 11.5 I couldn’t browse it, as it bombed out with some error. tib file dates back to 2010, so it predates both Acronis Backup 12.5 and Acronis Backup 11.5.)

    I’ve abandoned all effort with Acronis Backup as soon as I’ve found in another file a copy of individual files from Acer Aspire h341 internal flash (Acronis copy was from h340, but I believe the difference between the two is just HDD size; anyway Windows PE-based Windows Home Server Rescue Partition is by no means rocket science so it shouldn’t matter). Copied these to USB HDD formatted in NTFS, copy-pasted MBR boot code (first 440 bytes, after these volume serial number follows). changed first byte of first partition entry to 80 to make it active and I had a working, bootable media in 5 minutes, without having to even wipe it, in contrast to several hours long fiddling with Acronis Backup bloatware that ended in nothing.

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