Critical updates for S2D and Hyper-V

Microsoft released a new update for Windows Server 2016 (14393.2580) that fixes a bunch of critical issues in S2D and Hyper-V (FCI) environments:

  • Addresses an issue that depletes the storage space on a cluster-shared volume (CSV) because of a Hyper-V virtual hard disk (VHDX) expansion. As a result, a Virtual Machine (VM) might continue writing data to its disk until it becomes corrupted or stops working. The VM might also restart and then resume writing data until a corruption occurs.
  • Addresses an issue that occurs when using multiple Windows Server 2016 Hyper-V clusters. The following event appears in the log:

    “Cluster Shared Volume ‘CSVName’ (‘CSVName’) has entered a paused state because of ‘STATUS_USER_SESSION_DELETED(c0000203)’. All I/O will temporarily be queued until a path to the volume is reestablished.”

  • Addresses an issue that may cause the creation of a single node cluster or the addition of more nodes to a cluster to fail intermittently.
  • Addresses an issue that occurs when restarting a node after draining the node. Event ID 5120 appears in the log with a “STATUS_IO_TIMEOUT c00000b5” message. This may slow or stop input and output (I/O) to the VMs, and sometimes the nodes may drop out of cluster membership.
  • Addresses an issue that may cause the addition of nodes to fail intermittently after creating a single node in a Windows Server 2016 Cluster. The error code is, “0x0000001e”.

This update also resolves the following issues:

It’s highly recommended to apply the update as soon as possible.

How to customize a VMware ESXi image and install it in a Hyper-V VM

I’ve been doing recently  VMware ESXi deployment in my lab environment and would like to share main steps required to make it work on nested Hyper-V. Needless to say, nested virtualization works great only for demo and labs, therefore, running ESXi under Hyper-V is a completely unsupported in production environments.

Anyway, carry out the following steps to install ESXi (6.0, in my case. although these steps should work for newer versions as well):

1. Download VMWare ESXi offline bundle available at product download page (e.g. ESXi6.0). You can also download a ESXi image customized by vendor. For example, here is a direct download link for Dell’s ESXi 6.0 image which includes Dell’s VIBs in addition to built-in installation bundles provided by VMware.

2. Download the driver  which allows running ESXi as a VM under Microsoft Hyper-V (net-tulip, it’s actually a network driver which should be added to ESXi image. Otherwise, ESXi installation will be blocked)

3. Copy the downloaded files to the same folder (e.g. ‘D:\Images\VMware ESXi 6\’). It’ll be used as a work folder.

4. Download and install VMware PowerCLI 6.3 or newer

5. Once PowerCLI is installed,  run it and set location to the folder containing the files, then add offline depot ZIP files to the current PowerCLI session as shown below:

cd 'D:\Images\VMware ESXi 6\'
Add-EsxSoftwareDepot .\esxi60_bundle.zip
Add-EsxSoftwareDepot .\net-tulip-1.1.15-1-offline_bundle.zip

6. Retrieve the name of the standard image profile and note it (it’ll will be used as a clone for a new profile):

Get-EsxImageProfile|ft Name

7. Create a new image profile by cloning existing profile which name you just noted, and then add the driver’s package to the profile:

#Create a new image profile
New-EsxImageProfile -CloneProfile ESXi-6.0.0-2494585  -Name rlevchenko.com -Vendor custom

#Add custom packages
Add-EsxSoftwarePackage -ImageProfile rlevchenko.com -SoftwarePackage net-tulip -Force

image

If AcceptanceLevel is set to PartnerSupported by default (as in the picture above) and custom packages which you are going to add to the image profile have Community acceptance level, you will receive an error during creating an ESXi ISO and it’s installation . To resolve this, set the acceptance level of the image profile to CommunitySupported by running the following command: Set-EsxImageProfile -AcceptanceLevel CommunitySupported –ImageProfile rlevchenko.com

image

8. Now it’s time to create an ISO from the customized ESXi image.To do this, run the following command:

Export-EsxImageProfile -ImageProfile rlevchenko.com -FilePath D:\Images\esxi60_custom.iso -ExportToIso -Force

Create a new VM with the following settings:

  • Generation 1
  • Static RAM (> 4Gb is recommended)
  • More than 1vCPU
  • Legacy network adapter connected to the switch

A sample of VM’s configuration is shown below:

image

9. Once you finished to configure a VM, enable virtualization extensions on the VM’s CPU. Optionally, you can download a script available at github to check VM’s configuration and  enable nested virtualization. Both options are allowed:

#Option 1
Set-VMProcessor -VMName "vHost-01" -ExposeVirtualizationExtensions $True

#Option2
 .\Enable-NestedVM.ps1 -vmName "vHost-01"

10. Turn on the VM, attach the created ESXi ISO and press TAB on the boot screen, then type ignoreHeadless=TRUE and press Enter. Otherwise, ESXi boot will hang while booting  (I assume it’s all because ESXi is running on non-HCL hardware. VM is a bit out of the HCL list..).

esxi on hyper-v_1

11. Complete ESXi installation process (as usual), reboot it and press SHIFT+O during the startup, and then enable ignoreHeadless option again as shown in the screenshot:

esxi on hyper-v_4

Once ESXi is successfully started, define settings for management network, enable a Shell, and then press Alt+F1 to enter to a console. We need to set a VMKernel boot-time parameter. Otherwise, you will always need to enable ignoreHeadless after every reboot.

Provide root credentials and  type esxcfg-advcfg -k TRUE ignoreHeadless

esxi on hyper-v_6

Close the console by pressing ALT+F2, reboot ESXi and verify that it starts up seamlessly.

That’s it. Now you have a ESXi host running on a Hyper-V VM.

Until then,

enjoy your day :)!